Black History Month

The story of Black History Month begins in 1915, half a century after the Thirteenth Amendment abolished slavery in the United States.

That September, the Harvard-trained historian Carter G. Woodson and the prominent minister Jesse E. Moorland founded the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History, an organization dedicated to researching and promoting achievements by black Americans and other peoples of African descent.

Known today as the Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH), the group sponsored a national Negro History week in 1926, choosing the second week of February to coincide with the birthdays of Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass. The event inspired schools and communities nationwide to organize local celebrations, establish history clubs and host performances and lectures.

In the decades that followed, mayors across the country began issuing yearly proclamations recognizing Negro History Week. By the late 1960s, thanks in part to the civil rights movement and a growing awareness of black identity, Negro History Week had evolved into Black History Month on many college campuses.

President Gerald Ford officially recognized Black History Month in 1976, calling upon the public to “seize the opportunity to honor the too-often neglected accomplishments of black Americans in every area of endeavor throughout our history.”

The theme for Black History Month in 2019 is “Black Migrations,” which follows the movement of blacks from the American South to the industrialized North and beyond. Beginning in the 20th century south, migration included relocation from farms to cities, and from the South to the Northeast and Midwest.

history.com/topics/black-history/black-history-month

  • George Washington Carver developed 300 derivative products from peanuts among them cheese, milk, coffee, flour, ink, dyes, plastics, wood stains, soap, linoleum, medicinal oils and cosmetics.
  • Thurgood Marshall was the first African American ever appointed to the U.S. Supreme Court and served on the court from 1967 to 1991.
  • In 1940, Hattie McDaniel was the first African-American performer to win an Academy Award—the film industry’s highest honor—for her portrayal of a loyal slave governess in Gone With the Wind.
  • In 1992, Dr. Mae Jemison became the first African American woman to go into space aboard the space shuttle Endeavor.
  • John Mercer Langston was the first black man to become a lawyer when he passed the bar in Ohio in 1854.
  • Hiram Rhodes Revels was the first African American ever elected to the U.S. Senate. He represented the state of Mississippi from February 1870 to March 1871.
  • Shirley Chisholm was the first African American woman elected to the House of Representatives. She was elected in 1968 and represented the state of New York. She broke ground again four years later in 1972, when she was the first major party African-American candidate and the first female candidate for president of the United States.

history.com/topics/black-history/black-history-facts

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